Coronavirus (COVID-19) updates

New Student Portal
- A-levels

Here you'll find information, advice and guidance for applicants looking to study A-levels at Hugh Baird College's Sixth Form Centre, based at our South Sefton Campus, from September 2020.

Play

A message from Joe Poole, Director of Curriculum

I’d like to welcome you to our new A-level student portal. I’m delighted that you are planning to join us in the near future.

This portal has been created to give you a feel for the Sixth Form Centre before you arrive. On this page you can request to join our A-level student Facebook group, so that you can start connecting with other students who are likely to be your classmates in September!

There is also information on our support services and details on how to contact us with any concerns or queries you may have. We’re here to support you, so please do get in touch regarding anything you are unsure of or worried about.

Everybody at the South Sefton Campus of Hugh Baird College is looking forward to seeing you soon.

Joe

Enrolment

Enrolment for September 2020 entry will commence from 6 July 2020 and, if you have already applied, you will be notified with the required information prior to this. If you have any queries, please email our Admissions Team on: admissions@hughbaird.ac.uk.

Discover what's waiting for you!

We hope you're excited to be joining us. We're all looking forward to welcoming you to the Sixth Form Centre at Hugh Baird College's South Sefton Campus. To give you more of a feel for life at our vibrant Sixth Form Centre, check out this video.

Get a headstart on your studies

Choose a subject below to find what you could be reading, watching and doing to really help you hit the ground running when you join us.

Read

Look at the news (e.g. BBC Business news online) and read about what financial support the UK Government is making available to businesses during the Covid-19 crisis.

Watch
To do
  • Download an annual report for a business that you are interested in and make a note of the types of financial information that are included in this report.
  • Try and think of 5 different stakeholders (a stakeholder is somebody who is interested in or affected by the activities of a business) who might be interested in reading the financial report and make a note of why they are interested in it.
Read

Use BBC Bitesize to recap and consolidate the following topics:

  • Cells
  • Bonding
  • Electron configuration
  • The periodic table
  • Waves

Read articles on Science Daily

To do
  • Make sure you have a 30cm ruler, pen, pencil, scientific calculator, lined paper and a file ready for your first lesson!
  • Make a list of the Science topics you have studied at GCSE (that you can remember) and rank them in order of how confident you are with them. Please bring this list with you to your first lesson.
Watch
  • Loving Vincent (the first painted film in the history of cinema)
  • At Eternities Gate (biopic about VV Gogh)
  • Abstract (series one and two - each episode is about a different artist and different area/type of art and design)
  • Ai wei wei - never sorry (film about the Chinese artist Ai Wei Wei and his struggle against censorship and fighting for causes.)
  • Sky ladder: The Art of Cai quo-qiang (film about Cai Quo-qiang)
  • Iris (film about the fashion icon Iris and how she sees the world and works with colour, pattern and print)
  • Art of Conflict: murals of Northern Ireland (documentary about the peace walls in Northern Ireland)
  • Bob Ross: Beauty everywhere
  • The Artist is Present
  • Gethard Richter Painting
  • Guest of Cindy Sherman
  • Jonathan Yeo interviewed by Parkinson
  • Sky Portrait Artist of the Year (on All 4 & Sky)
  • Water Colour Artist of the Year (iPlayer & Sky)
  • Pottery Throw Down 2020 & 2015 (All 4)
  • Scandal and Beauty: Mark Gatiss on Aubery Beardsely
  • Age of the Image
Read
Watch
To do
  • Make sure you have a 30cm ruler, pen, pencil, scientific calculator, lined paper and a file ready for your first lesson!
  • Make a list of the Science topics you have studied at GCSE (that you can remember) and rank them in order of how confident you are with them. Please bring this list with you to your first lesson.
Read

Look at the news (e.g. BBC Business news online) and read about what financial support the UK Government is making available to businesses during the Covid-19 crisis.

Watch
To do

Research a well-known entrepreneur that you admire. E.g. British foodie entrepreneurs we like are Nisha Katona, Gary Usher and Alana Spencer, but you can look at whoever you want.

  • What do they do?
  • Where did their idea come from?
  • What is it that you admire about them?
  • What plans do they have for the future?
Read
To do
  • Make sure you have a 30cm ruler, pen, pencil, scientific calculator, lined paper and a file ready for your first lesson!
  • Make a list of the Science topics you have studied at GCSE (that you can remember) and rank them in order of how confident you are with them. Please bring this list with you to your first lesson.
Read
Watch
To do
Read
  • BBC News - keep up to date with local and national crime news (new laws, legal changes, campaigns, crimes, convictions)
  • Any fiction or non-fiction books about crime that you are interested in. Whether this be serious organised crime or crimes of the powerful, choose books that appeal to your interests!
Watch

The following series, dramas and documentaries will enrich your knowledge of a variety of crimes and criminals, explanations of crime, crime scene investigations, the process of prosecution and sentencing. All are available via Neflix:

  • When they see us
  • Narcos
  • Making a Murderer
  • Ted Bundy Tapes
  • The Keepers
  • Evil Genius
  • When they see us
  • The Disappearance of Madeline McCann
  • How to get away with Murder
  • Dirty John: The Dirty Truth
  • Casting Jon Benet
  • Captive for 18 years: The Jaycee Lee story
  • Stacey Dooley investigates (BBC3)
To do
Read
  • As part of the course you will interpret and practically explore plays from different periods, styles and genres. Prepare for this by reading a range of texts. Each week, Nick Hern Books are making one play available for free (following the link below). There is also an opportunity to have your questions answered by the playwright.
  • www.nickhernbooks.co.uk/playgroup
  • For a brilliant introduction to all things theatre and the people who make it, read The National Theatre’s book - ‘All About Theatre’.
Watch
To do
  • You will need to bring a pen, paper and a folder.
  • Take the opportunity to watch as much digital or live theatre as possible.
  • Read a range of plays from different periods, styles and genres.
  • Make a note of the best live/digital production you have ever seen and explain why. You will need this for our first lesson in September.
Read

Follow the Business and Economics news. Read about how the economy is performing and focus on unemployment figures, inflation and economic growth. Follow topical issues such as NHS funding, minimum prices for alcohol, universal credit.

Watch
To do
  • Research task - find out how and why the government are supporting individuals and businesses to cope with Covid-19, and the impact of Covid-19 on the economy.
Read
  • You Say Potato by David Crystal (know your hero!)
  • Eats Shoots and Leaves by Lynn Truss (know your enemy!)
  • The Guardian – culture and opinion sections (you will be learning to write lifestyle journalism as part of the course – and this is an element of the exam)
  • 1984 by George Orwell (Looking at how language is used to control people)

Some of these may be easier to get hold of for free than others. You will certainly be able to find discussions of, and passages from Lynn Truss’ book online if you can’t find the whole text. Similarly, a lot of David Crystal’s writing is online.

Watch
To do
  • Get together a number of folders that you can assign to different topics when you begin the course in September.
  • Start a journal about your experience of lockdown, a blog about your favourite bands or authors, a series of short stories – whatever kind of writing you like. Just try to do some writing once or twice a week. This will help you to develop the ‘personal voice’ that is so necessary for A Level Language study.
  • Take an interest in how language is used to describe different groups in society e.g. women, people with different sexualities, people who are financially vulnerable – just take an interest when you come upon it.
Read
  • Tess of the D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  • When will There Be Good News? by Kate Atkinson
  • Brighton Rock by Graham Greene
  • Mythos by Stephen Fry
  • The culture and opinion sections of The Guardian – or another broadsheet of your choice. The Independent is mostly free – and you can sign up to articles form The New York Times. The importance of developing your cultural knowledge and the ability to form opinions cannot be overstated.

Read lots of whatever you want – for pleasure. This is very important. If you would like some general ideas of texts that are excellent to read but not on the course I would suggest the following as a starting point: ‘Why be Happy When you Could be Normal’ by Jeanette Winterson, ‘The Bell Jar’ by Sylvia Plath, ‘Beloved’ by Toni Morrison, ‘On the Road’ by Jack Kerouac, ‘Norwegian Wood’ by Haruki Murakami, ‘The Rachel Papers’ by Martin Amis.

Watch
To do
  • Get together a number of folders that you can assign to the different topics that we will begin studying in September
  • Keep a reading journal. Note down what you read / listen to including your favourite quotes.
  • Try to read a newspaper article from a broadsheet paper (online) at least once a week.
  • Take an interest in new authors being published – look at this year’s Booker Prize winners, and see if you fancy giving any of these books a go – broaden your literary horizons!
  • Check out insta poets such as Atticus and modern poets like the wonderful Mary Oliver.
Read
  • Dystopian fiction – The Handmaid’s Tale is our set text, but it is also very worthwhile checking out 1984 by George Orwell
  • The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald – this is the set text – Tender is the Night is also wonderful.
  • The Paris Wife by Paula McLain.
  • The culture and opinion sections of The Guardian – or another broadsheet of your choice. The Independent is mostly free – and you can sign up to articles form The New York Times. The importance of developing your cultural knowledge and the ability to form opinions cannot be overstated.
  • Read lots of whatever you want – for pleasure. This is very important. If you would like some general ideas of texts that are excellent to read but not on the course I would suggest the following as a starting point: ‘Why be Happy When You Could Be Normal’ by Jeanette Winterson, ‘The Bell Jar’ by Sylvia Plath, ‘Beloved’ by Toni Morrison, ‘On the Road’ by Jack Kerouac, ‘Norwegian Wood’ by Haruki Murakami, ‘The Rachel Papers’ by Martin Amis.
Watch
  • There is a beautiful documentary about Seamus Heaney – the poet we will be studying – called ‘Seamus Heaney and the Music of What Happens’.
  • There is a good Hulu series of Handmaid’s Tale. It’s very good for getting a ‘feel’ for Gilead – but do beware that it diverges from the book a lot and makes our protagonist seem a lot more ‘badass’ then she actually is in the novel.
  • Listen to BBC Radio 4's Open Book – many podcasts are available online
  • Also listen to BBC Radio 4’s Poetry Extra
  • Try to watch the Marlon Brandon version of the film ‘A Streetcar Named Desire’ – there is another 90s version of the film on YouTube but the Brandon version is far superior.
To do
  • Get together a number of folders that you can assign to the different topics that we will begin studying in September
  • Keep a reading journal. Note down what you read / listen to including your favourite quotes.
  • Try to read a newspaper article from a broadsheet paper (online) at least once a week.
  • Take an interest in new authors being published – look at this year’s Booker Prize winners, and see if you fancy giving any of these books a go – broaden your literary horizons!
  • Check out insta poets such as Atticus and modern poets like the wonderful Mary Oliver.
Read
  • Thomas Schatz - The Genius of the System
  • Film Art - Kristin Thompson & David Bordwell
  • Easy Riders, Raging Bulls - Peter Biskind
Watch
  • Cops (B. Keaton, 1922)
  • Double Indemnity (Wilder,1944)
  • Sunset Boulevard (Wilder, 1950)
  • Singin' in the Rain (Kelly/Donen, 1952)
  • Some Like it Hot (Wilder, 1959)
  • Psycho (Hitchcock, 1960)
  • 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick, 1968)
  • Easy Rider (Hopper, 1969)
  • Sorcerer (Friedkin, 1977)
  • Alien (Scott, 1979)
  • They Live (Carpenter, 1988)
  • Jackie Brown (Tarantino, 1997)
  • Hero (Yimou, 2002)
  • Senna (Kapadia, 2010)
  • Ladybird (Gerwig, 2017)
To do
  • In the run up to the start of the Film Studies course, record a Film Diary. This is a document/folder/social media account where you record the films you watch, the genre of the film, the director name, the production company/studio, and a short personal review of the film.
  • There are a lot of essays on my (Matt – Teacher of Film Studies) website alongside my lessons, feel free to have a look here: https://mattheworegan9.wixsite.com/film
  • Become a film blogger! You will have access to the 'blog' section of my page so you can publish your reviews.
Read
  • There are over 350 different careers in the NHS alone. You might want to explore some of these options. You can use the NHS website below to see where a qualification in Health and Social Care can lead you, in health care, in social care and in public health.
  • www.healthcareers.nhs.uk/working-health/we-are-nhs
Watch
To do
  • Explore the new bursaries available for health care workers. From September 2020 students studying nursing, midwifery, and any other allied health subjects, such as dietetics, occupational therapy, operating department practitioner, orthoptics, physiotherapy, radiography, speech and language therapy and paramedic students, may receive a non-repayable and non-means tested (universal) grant of up to £5000 a year.
  • https://www.thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk/nhs-bursary#Funding_NHS_bursary_ENGLAND
Read
Watch

“Land of the Czars”:

To do
  • Watch the three “Land of the Czars” films
  • Read the National Geographic website article about the end of the Czars and then:
  • Make a poster about one of the following. This could be A4 or A3, make it as creative as possible and you must bring this in on your first day in college in September as we will be using them so you need to be prepared to talk about your design and content:
  • Social Structure of Russia before 1917
  • Bloody Sunday of 1905
  • The February/March 1917 Revolution
  • The October 1917 Revolution
  • Lenin and Trotsky
Read
  • The Secret Barrister
  • A life of crime - Harry Ognall
  • Court Number One, Trials That Defined Modern Britain - Thomas Grant
  • In Your Defence - Sarah Langford
Watch
  • Silk (BBC TV series)
  • Defending the guilty (BBC TV series)
  • The Jury (ITV TV series)
  • The Trial (Channel 4 TV series)
  • Any true crime documentary based in England from sources such as BBC iPlayer, ITV Hub, All 4, Demand5, Netflix, Prime Video or YouTube.
To do
  • Visit the Crown Court at The Queen Elizabeth II Law Courts, Derby Square, Liverpool L2 1XA, and watch a live trial. These are open to the public, but you are better going earlier on in the week.
  • Alternatively/additionally, visit your local magistrates court.
Read
Watch
To do
Read
  • Any newspapers or online established online news sites are important because a knowledge of current affairs and global events is important.
  • A newspaper which is good to read regularly for media specific articles is The Guardian.
  • To give you an idea of the way we approach media studies and the sort of Media products that we will be studying then students should read some (or all) of the articles in the excellent: Media Magazine.
  • A link to a free copy here: https://www.englishandmedia.co.uk/assets/uploads/documents/MM62web.pdf
Watch

With a subject that studies so many different types of media, it would be impossible to give a definitive ‘watch list’ that wouldn’t take all year! However, to incorporate this with a ‘to do’ list it would be very useful if students were to watch/listen/play at least one of the following over the summer:

  • A film
  • A feature length documentary
  • A podcast
  • A video game
To do
  • Write a review of two of the different media products that they have watched, played or listened to! The review doesn’t have to be very long but should include some judgement on how good (or bad) the product was as well as opinions using evidence from the product!
  • Finally, the students can watch some of the Media Vlogs that I record for the Media Studies website. They should feel free to comment on any that they find interesting or have an opinion about! Watch here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL5IW1Uk0GxzwjUZyIbYAvHU3c2c6S4oi4
Read
  • BBC Sport website. This will give you update sports news from around the world. Keep up to date with re-scheduled events and how athletes are coping with current changes to their training schedules. There are many articles posted in this site about a wide range of sports activities. Expand your knowledge about different sports, sports performers and issues surrounding sports.
Watch
  • ‘The Game Changers’, Netflix. This is documentary about sports performers adopting a plant based diet (Vegan) and the benefits it brings to their performance. You may not want to change your diet, but the science of what’s in our food and how it affects sports performance is fascinating, and it might change your mind!
  • Netflix is full of sports documentaries. Have a look around and get watching. Feedback your interesting sports facts in September.
To do
  • Keep fit! You will be regularly assessed in your chosen sports activity, resulting in a practical exam. One requirement of being a competent athlete is high levels of physical fitness. Maintain or improve your levels of fitness by completing regular runs, cycle rides, YouTube workouts (there are so many out there… check out Joe Wicks P.E. lessons). Get those levels of endurance up!
  • If you are not part of a team or club in your chosen sports activity… find one to join! Research local teams and find one you can join. Bring the name of the club, the times and days of your training sessions to your first lesson in September.
Read
  • For a brilliant introduction to all things theatre and the people who make it read The National Theatre’s book - ‘All About Theatre’ available on Amazon.
  • A revolutionary choreographer is Matthew Bourne. We will be studying his work next year. This link leads to an article about his work Swan Lake: https://studentnewspaper.org/matthew-bournes-swan-lake/
  • The Essential Guide to Dance is a great book that covers all aspects of dance from choreography to understanding professional dance works. This is available on Amazon.
Watch
To do
  • You will need to get a pen, paper and a folder.
  • You will need to wear appropriate clothing that allows you to work practically during lessons.
  • Take the opportunity to watch as much digital or live theatre as possible.
Read
  • 'Philosophy - The Basics' by Nigel Warburton
  • 'The Philosophy Files' - Stephen Law
Watch
  • 'The Good Place' all four series.
  • 'Black Mirror' Series 2 and 3.
To do
  • Ponder how you decide what's morally right and wrong.
  • Ponder how you decide what's true and what's false - how do you judge the truth of a claim?
Read
  • A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson
  • Big Bang: The Most Important Scientific Discovery of All Time and Why You Need to Know About It by Simon Singh
  • A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking
  • The Universe in a Nutshell by Stephen Hawking
  • The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes
  • Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut’s Journeys by Michael Collins (the Apollo 11 astronaut)
  • 13 Things That Don’t Make Sense: The Most Intriguing Scientific Mysteries of Our Time by Michael Brooks
  • Surely You’re Joking Mr Feynman by Richard P Feynman and Ralph Leighton
  • Six Easy Pieces: Fundamentals of Physics Explained by Richard P Feynman (or any other book by the same author)
  • New Scientist is widely available in national news outlets, can be delivered to your home, is available via subscription online, and can be found in all libraries. There are many other unbiased sources of physics news online, including nature.com, physics.org, theguardian.com, independent.co.uk – and popular search engines will provide hundreds of others. The only caveat would be that not all internet sources are unbiased and/or factually correct!
  • www.xkcd.com is a great, and frequently updated, online web comic that puts a rather unique spin on physics and science. Highly recommended.
Watch
  • Watch any or all of the “Schools Lecture series” videos made by the Institute of Physics. Don’t be put off by the title – they are all presented by experts in physics at the right kind of level, and the topics covered will really help you understand some of the details of the A-level course. http://www.iop.org/resources/videos/education/

  • You could spend your whole life watching physics video clips on YouTube. No need, however, as the minutephysics channel is all you’ll ever really need – and all clips are only a minute long. Subscribe. Watch them all. http://www.youtube.com/user/minutephysics

  • Richard Feynman’s “Messenger Lectures” on physics, archived with transcripts on Microsoft’s Project Tuva website. http://research.microsoft.com/apps/tools/tuva/
  • Mythbusters (on Quest, but also on cable and satellite channels) – arguably the best show about scientific investigation, with added rockets! Watch it.

  • The Sky at Night (BBC4) – longest running science TV programme in the universe, everything current in space and astronomy with experts.

  • Horizon (BBC2 and BBC4) – topical science documentary, often physics-based. There have been some really interesting episodes about neutrinos, time, black holes, etc.
Listen

Mainly BBC Radio 4 broadcasts but are also available via iPlayer and can be downloaded from the BBC website as podcasts. These are in order, starting with the most relevant:

  • In Our Time - Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss the history of ideas. Usually four professors having a sensible discussion, frequently on physics topics. Vast archive going back years, and more being added all the time. Examples of relevant episodes: The Age of the Universe, Radiation, The Vacuum of Space, The Measurement Problem in Physics, The Multiverse, Gravitational Waves, The Speed of Light, and many more.

  • The Life Scientific - Professor Jim Al-Khalili talks to leading scientists about their life and work, finding out what inspires and motivates them and asking what their discoveries might do for mankind. Many episodes available on iPlayer.

  • Frontiers - Programme exploring new ideas in science and meeting the scientists and researchers responsible for them, as well as hearing from their critics. Dozens of episodes available on iPlayer.

  • The Infinite Monkey Cage – A more light-hearted look at current scientific topics and issues with Professor Brian Cox and Robin Ince.
To do
  • SETI@home is a scientific experiment that uses Internet-connected computers in the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI). You can participate by running a free program that downloads and analyses radio telescope data. http://setiathome.berkeley.edu/

  • Asteroid Watch allows you to search for Near Earth Objects (i.e. asteroids) in observations that have been made, and report back their positions. http://www.schoolsobservatory.org.uk/activ/asteroidwatch

  • Galaxy Zoo – to understand how galaxies, and our own, formed we need your help to classify them according to their shapes — a task at which your brain is better than even the most advanced computer. If you're quick, you may even be the first person in history to see each of the galaxies you're asked to classify. http://www.galaxyzoo.org/

  • Zooniverse – many other projects similar to galaxy zoo: solar stormwatch, planet hunters, the Milky Way project. https://www.zooniverse.org/

  • PhET interactive simulations. Fun, interactive, research-based simulations of physical phenomena from the PhET project at the University of Colorado. This site will be used again and again during your A-level course. http://phet.colorado.edu/

  • Follow Physicists on Twitter: Brian Cox @ProfBrianCox, Jim Al-Khalili @jimalkhalili, Andy Newsam @AstroAndyN, Michio Kaku @michiokaku
Read
Watch
To do
  • Read the two web pages as an overview of British Politics
  • Watch the six videos from “ An Introduction to Parliament” to “Your Voice in Parliament”
  • Make a poster about one of the following. This could be A4 or A3, make it as creative as possible and you must bring this in on your first day in college in September as we will be using them so you need to be prepared to talk about your design and content:
    • The UK Constitution
    • What is Democracy
    • The First Past the Post electoral system
    • Who is in the UK Cabinet
    • Electoral Reform since 1832
    • The devolved institutions of the UK
Read
Watch
Read
  • A daily newspaper (e.g. The Guardian or The Independent)
  • BBC News online
  • Chavs: The Demonization of the Working Class by Owen Jones
  • Gang Leader for a Day by Sudhir Venkatesh
  • The Ragged Trousered Philantropists by Robert Tressell
  • Sociology Review (a periodical) published by Phillip Allan Magazine
Watch
  • BBC News
  • Question Time
  • Stacey Dooley documentaries
  • Louis Theroux documentaries
  • Panorama
  • Black Mirror
  • Bend It Like Beckham
  • Quadrophenia
  • One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest
  • Made In Dagenham
  • Pride
  • East Is East
  • The Shawshank Redemption
To do
  • Download the BBC News App
  • Buy the following textbooks (not compulsory) - AQA A Level Sociology Book One including AS Level by Rob Webb et al (2015) published by Napier Press, Succeed at A Level Sociology Book One including AS Level; The Complete Revision Guide by Rob Webb & Keith Trobe, published by Napier Press.
Read
  • Authentic Spanish articles from Spanish newspapers
  • Novel - Las Bicicletas Son Para El Verano
Watch
  • Spanish films including 'María llena eres de gracias'
  • Netflix Spanish speaking series
To do
  • Revise verb tenses (501 Spanish verbs book)
  • Use Quizlet to revise grammar points and verbs

Need more information or have a question?

If you have any queries in relation to your application/enrolment, courses or the College in general, we have staff from all subjects and support services who would be happy to help.

Simply email admissions@hughbaird.ac.uk and we can ensure your query gets to the correct member of staff.

Meet other students

Join our Facebook Group specifically for new A-level students. It’s ideal for making new friends before you join Hugh Baird College’s Sixth Form Centre for real.

Request to join the group

Watch some of our recent Facebook Live Information Sessions on important Student Services you can access

Supporting you all the way

Coming to a new Sixth Form Centre is a big change in your life, there’s so much information to take in, and so many different things to consider.

Wellbeing

If you need support/advice with your mental health or wellbeing, you can access external services via our Mental Health Support Portal.

Support Portal

Financial Support

Worries over money and finance shouldn’t stop you from coming to College. We have a number of bursaries and packages available to you.

Find out more

Careers Advice

Our team of independent Careers Advisors are fully trained to help you find the perfect career option that suits you.

Email the team

Learner Support

We have specialist tutors, modern support software and highly-trained support staff. We support every single student, regardless of their challenges.

Find out more

Follow us

Get up to date with all the latest goings-on and keep in the loop about upcoming events by following our social media channels:

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Student Success

Look at where some of our former students have moved on to. This could be you in two years!

Get Ready for Sixth Form Live Event

Broadcasting: 1pm on 14 July 2020.

This live online event is for both those who have applied, and those who are yet to apply, to study A-levels at the Hugh Baird College South Sefton Campus.

Register your place

Contacts

If you need some more information about your courses, you can email a tutor by tapping on their name below. For all other enquiries, please email Joe Poole, Director of Curriculum, on joe.poole@hughbaird.ac.uk.

Have you applied yet?

If you have not applied to study A-levels with us yet, don't worry, you still have time. Tap the button below to start your application:

Apply now